Brisbane Tours, Hotels, Restaurants, Weather, Map, Culture & Things to Do – Travel Guide in Australia

Brisbane Tours, Hotels, Restaurants, Weather, Map, Culture & Things to Do - Travel Guide in Australia

When mapping out your Australian vacation, a visit to Queensland’s capital won’t be your first choice. The country’s third biggest metropolis is often not noted in want of Australia’s more famous visitor hot spots, which include Sydney and Melbourne. But Brisbane subtropical climate, thriving arts and stay song scene and bevy of outside to-dos make it a worthy destination in your next ride Down Under.

Tucked into the southeast corner of Queensland (aka the Sunshine State), Brisbane is as easygoing as it’s far sophisticated. The city’s riverside putting makes it a perfect getaway for adventurers, but its trendy restaurant and nightlife scene will also enchantment to those searching for a big-metropolis ambiance. Thrill-seekers will delight in heart-pumping activities like climbing Story Bridge, while sports fanatics cannot miss a chance to catch a rugby match at Suncorp Stadium. Meanwhile, those craving relaxation will find it at the City Botanic Gardens, Roma Street Parkland and the Brisbane Botanic Gardens Mount Coot-tha.

Things To Do in Brisbane

Much of Brisbane’s activity takes location around the winding Brisbane River, which slithers its manner thru the city and other components of southeastern Queensland. Make the most of the water by taking a free river cruise on a CityHopper. Prefer to admire the scene with two feet firmly planted on ground? Lounge with your mates at one of Brisbane’s many outdoor spaces, such as Roma Street Parkland and the City Botanic Gardens. For an even more impressive scene, head up to the Brisbane Lookout, Mount Coot-tha, where you’ll be met with 360-degree views that stretch as far as neighboring Moreton Bay. Or, take in your surroundings from atop Story Bridge.

  • Brisbane Botanic Gardens Mount Coot-tha
  • City Botanic Gardens
  • Story Bridge
  • Roma Street Parkland
  • Brisbane Lookout, Mount Coot-tha
  • Museum of Brisbane
  • CityHopper
  • Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary
  • Suncorp Stadium

Hotels in Brisbane

The top of the line hotels in Brisbane are arranged by hotel class and afterward by user rating, as gave by TripAdvisor. Here you can find rates, information about the leading Brisbane hotels.

  • Emporium Hotel
  • Hilton Brisbane
  • Meriton Suites Adelaide Street- Brisbane
  • Sofitel Brisbane Central
  • The New Inchcolm Hotel Brisbane MGallery by Sofitel
  • W Brisbane
  • NEXT Hotel Brisbane
  • Quay West Suites Brisbane
  • Treasury Casino & Hotel
  • Stamford Plaza Brisbane
  • Meriton Suites Herschel Street- Brisbane
  • Diana Plaza Hotel
  • Quest Spring Hill
  • The Docks on Goodwin
  • The Point Brisbane – Hotel
  • Adina Apartment Hotel Brisbane Anzac Square
  • Evolution Apartments
  • Hotel Chino
  • Hotel Grand Chancellor Brisbane
  • Hotel Urban Brisbane
  • Oaks 212 Margaret
  • Oaks Casino Towers
  • Oaks Charlotte Towers
  • Oaks Festival Towers
  • Oaks on Felix
  • Quest River Park Central
  • Royal On The Park
  • Rydges South Bank

Brisbane Travel Guide

Best Time to Visit Brisbane

The best time to travel Brisbane is from March to May – autumn in the Southern Hemisphere. Temperatures in the course of this season hover between the high 50s and mid-80s with little rainfall later inside the season. But keep in mind that you will need to slather on the sunscreen: Brisbane sees an average of eight hours of sun per day thanks to its subtropical climate. The city’s winter (June to August) and spring (September to November) are also famous instances to go to way to the mild temps and dry days. But these two seasons also see lots of hotels booked solid, specially in September in the course of the month-lengthy arts celebration called the Brisbane Festival. If you’re making plans to visit at some stage in the arts festival, arrange your accommodations properly in advance. You’ll find better airfare and hotel room deals throughout Brisbane’s wet, humid season, which spans from December all the manner to early March. Simply note that the soggy weather may put a damper on your open activities.

March-May

As Brisbane comes off its moist summer season, rainfall begins to decrease and the temperatures prepare to dip with the upcoming wintry weather months. Be that as it may, there’s no compelling reason to pack anything over a light jacket in the event that you visit during this season: Average autumn time temperatures will linger during the 70s. The event calendar is just as full of events as it is within the peak winter or spring seasons, but you may have an less complicated time scoring some great hotel deals.

  • Brisbane Comedy Festival (February-March)
  • CMC Rocks QLD (March)
  • World Science Festival Brisbane (March)
  • Redcliffe Festival of Sails (April)
  • Bike Week (May)

June-August

This is wintertime in Brisbane, but do not allow that label idiot you. Average temperatures rest comfortably in the low 60s and the calendar is filled with mostly sunny days. Along with the glorious weather, the city also puts on several big outside events, such as Ekka and the Regional Flavors meals and wine festival. These celebrations (and the mild temps) draw Aussies from Sydney and Melbourne, as well as international travelers, so be prepared for elevated hotel rates and heavy crowds.

  • Out of the Box Festival (June)
  • Queensland Music Festival (July)
  • Regional Flavors (July)
  • Royal Queensland Show (Ekka) (August)
  • Redcliffe KiteFest (August)

September-November

Springtime in Brisbane is marked by warm days and breezy nights. Daytime temperatures sit in the 60s and 70s with only the occasional shower. The pleasant weather complements the city’s busy occasion calendar: The much-loved Brisbane Festival takes region during September, finishing with a spectacular fireworks display (known as Sunsuper Riverfire) on the river. If you need to visit for the duration of the festival, plan your trip several months in advance: Hotels top off quickly.

  • Brisbane Writers Festival (September)
  • Brisbane Festival (September)
  • Valley Fiesta (October)
  • Oktoberfest Brisbane (October)

December-February

This is Brisbane’s wet, humid summer season with temperatures reaching the mid-80s. The region sees the most rainfall in January and February; thunderstorms are common, and heavy precipitation may lead to floods. Hotels and attractions may be less crowded, but the rain may prevent you from enjoying the best of Brisbane’s outdoor pursuits. Luckily, you’ll have the yearly comedy competition to preserve your wet day blues at bay.

  • Woodford Folk Festival (December-January)
  • BrisAsia Festival (January-February)
  • MELT (January-February)
  • Brisbane Comedy Festival (February-March)

Culture

As Queensland’s bustling capital, Brisbane is an energetic, brand new town with a thriving arts and restaurant scene. But while it may have embraced a cool, contemporary disposition to match that of its siblings, Sydney and Melbourne, Brisbane still has one foot firmly tied to its Aboriginal roots. You’ll see this within the song and dance demonstrations of the Yuggera tribe, which gathers at the bottom of the Kangaroo Point Cliffs (just south of downtown Brisbane).

But Brisbane’s Aboriginal birthright is handiest one part of its overall history: The city’s military heritage is also remembered with several memorial sites, including ANZAC Square and the National Freedom Wall in the Brisbane Botanic Gardens Mount Coot-tha. ANZAC Day – a national day of remembrance in both Australia and New Zealand – honors the military contributions and sacrifices of each country’s servicemen and women. ANZAC Day, celebrated annually on April 25, is a national public holiday similar to Memorial Day in the U.S., so if you’re visiting in late April, be prepared for businesses and attractions to be closed.

Americans should feel at home here, with English as the official language. However, getting behind the wheel will take a little getting used to since Aussies drive on the left side of the road. Also, Brisbane is located in the Southern Hemisphere, so the seasons are opposite of what those of us living in the Northern Hemisphere are used to: Our summer is Brisbane’s winter. For currency, Aussies use the Australian dollar. AU$1 equals about $0.76, but currency rates tend to fluctuate, so consult a currency calculator before your trip.

Sports are an important component of Brisbane culture. Two massive venues – The Gabba and Suncorp Stadium – host rugby, football (soccer) and cricket games with crowds of 40,000 to 50,000 screaming fans. But Brisbane’s love of sport doesn’t stop there. Thanks to the city’s sunny weather and various public spaces (like Roma Street Parkland), Brisbanites are an active community.

What to Eat in Brisbane

You’ll find pretty much every kind of cuisine in Brisbane, from Turkish and Chinese to Vietnamese, Spanish and, of course, Australian. Aussie staples served in Brisbane and all through the nation incorporate meat pies (a meat and gravy-stuffed baked pastry), potato wedges and different meats coated with piri piri (a spicy sauce). Don’t be surprised in case you spot kangaroo, wallaby, emu or crocodile listed as specialty menu items. Given the city’s proximity to the ocean, a lot of Brisbane’s restaurants places also characteristic domestically sourced seafood, which include seasonal oysters, murray cod, barramundi and mulloway.

Explore Brisbane’s downtown vicinity to revel in some of the city’s pinnacle restaurants. Esquire and The EURO are two popular eateries situated less than a mile from each other on Brisbane’s north bank (a little more than a mile from the city center). Both restaurants get hold of a stamp of approval from locals and travelers alike for her delicious, inventive cuisine. Stokehouse Q, which sits essentially south of the downtown area in South Brisbane, is another traveler most loved choices to its modern Australian menu (think roast lamb rump and smoked swordfish). Stick around the area’s South Bank district for the high-quality waterfront dining. This rising culinary region boasts trendy, alfresco eateries that offer the entirety from classic Italian to Champagne and oyster bars. For extra European-stimulated menus, check out New Farm, a suburb on Brisbane’s north bank. Quaint bistros, stylish wine bars and a famous neighborhood haunt, Chouquette Boulangerie Patisserie, may be observed along the tree-covered streets.

Farmers markets are another large part of Brisbane’s foodie culture. The popular Boundary Street Markets set up shop in considered one of Brisbane’s suburbs, the West End, every Friday and Saturday. But you may also discover Jan Powers Farmers Markets stationed in diverse neighborhoods around the city, inclusive of downtown Queen Street, New Farm, Mitchelton and Manly. Other popular meals bazaars consist of Brisbane MarketPlace Rocklea and Eat Street Markets.

Restaurants in Brisbane

  • Flour & Chocolate Patisserie
  • Betty’s Burgers & Concrete Co.
  • Rogue Bistro
  • Wooden Horse Restaurant
  • Gala Thai
  • Restaurant Dan Arnold
  • Bacchus
  • MADO Cafe and Restaurant
  • Fogata Latin Fusion Bar & Restaurant
  • Olive Thyme Turkish Cuisine
  • Betty’s Burgers & Concrete Co.
  • Kennigo Social House
  • Casa Nostra Ristorante
  • Sono Japanese Restaurant Portside Wharf
  • Libertine Restaurant & Cocktail Bar
  • Double Shot New Farm
  • Putia Pure Food Kitchen
  • Urbane Restaurant
  • Betty’s Burgers & Concrete
  • La Vue Waterfront Restaurant

Safety

Don’t count on to come across any primary crime when traveling Brisbane. However, as with any huge city, you should take precautions. Stay alert when walking around unexpected areas, in particular at night.

While you won’t have to worry about the threat of serious crime when visiting Queensland’s capital, don’t forget about another, often forgotten danger: the sun. In view of Brisbane’s subtropical area, it’s anything but difficult to get burned quickly – even on overcast days. Remember to wear sunscreen and a brimmed hat if you’re out and about.

Getting Around Brisbane

The great way to get around Brisbane is by using public transportation. Thanks to the mixture of buses, ferries, trams and trains operated by way of TransLink, the central business district and outer suburbs are clean to reach. You can even take a teach from the Brisbane Airport (BNE) to the central enterprise district through the city’s Airtrain system. (The airport is positioned approximately 11 miles northeast of the downtown area.) Or, rely upon your personal two feet to get around the city. Brisbane’s compact size lends itself nicely to biking and walking, mainly along the various paths that comply with the river’s winding curves. Only rent a car in case you plan to drive to Brisbane’s outer regions, like Moreton Bay or the Redlands; you won’t need your own set of wheels with this city’s dependable public transportation.

To resultseasily transfer among the numerous public transportation modes, use a common rider pass, like a go card or seeQ card. A seeQ card permits you to apply any TransLink bus, train, tram or ferry for three or five consecutive days. With this card, you can travel throughout Brisbane. Plus, the card includes two Airtrain trips. A go card differs from a seeQ card in that you can choose how a lot money to place at the card. You can replenish the balance of your card online, at go card places and at fare machines in train stations and pick bus stations. Fares for Brisbane’s public transportation are determined on a region system. There are 8 zones, however most of the top attractions in Brisbane are situated within Zone 1.

Ferry

Brisbane’s ferry service is called CityCat. There are 21 CityCats that operate among 25 terminals stationed alongside the Brisbane River, from The University of Queensland at St. Lucia to Northshore Hamilton. CityCats perform from approximately 5:15 to 12:45 a.m. (instances can vary relying on if the provider is upstream or downstream), walking every 15 or 30 minutes all week long, with explicit routes at some point of rush hour. (You can also use the free CityHopper ferry, which provides complimentary service between Sydney Street and North Quay.) Because the ferry system is operated by TransLink, you can pay for ferry rides utilizing your go card or seeQ card. Fare costs fluctuate depending on the number of zones you pass through. If you do now not have a pre-loaded card, you could buy a single paper ticket – which begin at $4.60 Australian dollars (about $3.50) for Travel inside Zone one – from a fare machine, a ticket office or on board the ferry.

Bus

For journeys round Brisbane’s central business district and the adjacent Spring Hill neighborhood, use the free loop buses. Operated by TransLink, the City Loop bus makes stops at popular areas like Central station, the Queen Street Mall, the City Botanic Gardens and Riverside Centre. The City Loop bus runs Monday via Friday each 10 minutes among 7 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. The Spring Hill Loop bus, meanwhile, gives a convenient way to get between the CBD and Roma Street Parkland each Monday thru Friday between 6 a.m. and 7:15 p.m.

TransLink also operates routes between the Brisbane suburbs and the city center. These are referred to as BUZ services and run every day from 6 a.m. To 11:30 p.m. At 10 to 15 minute brief interims, contingent upon top busy times. You pays for bus rides together with your cross or seeQ card by using touching the card to the reader on the bus. You can also pay with a paper ticket, which may be bought from a bus driver (except on prepaid buses) or from fare machines at bus stations. Like ferries, paper bus tickets begins at AU$4.60 per person.

Light Rail

You can also get around Brisbane’s central business district and outer suburbs using the city’s six exclusive TransLink rail lines. Fares vary depending on the time of day and the distance traveled (divided by zones). A single paper price ticket for one area traveled starts offevolved at AU$4.60; you may buy single paper tickets from the price ticket office or fare machine located at light rail stations. Go card fares start at AU$2.56 (or less than $2), while seeQ cards cost between AU$79 (about $61) and AU$129 ($99) for adults and AU$40 (approximately $31) and AU$65 ($50) for children ages 5 to 14.

If you’re coming from the airport, hop on the targeted rail line known as the Airtrain. It travels immediately to the metropolis center, making stops on the Fortitude Valley, Central and Roma Street stations. The Airtrain runs seven days a week from 4:10 a.m. on weekdays and 5:40 a.m. on weekends till around midnight; trains depart every 15 or 30 minutes. One-manner fares from the airport fee AU$18 (about $14), while round-ride fares value AU$34 (or roughly $26). Tickets can be purchased at the ticket vending stations located at the airport. Reduced rates are also available for the ones who buy on the Airtrain website. You can also pay with your go card. (However, you may not get hold of a go card discount on trips from the airport).

Bike

Thanks to the town’s 300-plus miles of pathways, Brisbane is without traversed by bike. You can rent bikes from several shops for about AU$20 (around $15.50) per 1.5 hours or approximately AU$35 (less than $27) per day, or you can use the CityCycle bike-share program. More than one hundred forty CityCycle stations are dispersed all through Brisbane’s city center, from the neighborhood of Newstead inside the east to the internal western suburb of Toowong. To take advantage of the bike-share program, you can ride for less than 30 minutes for free or purchase a subscription: Daily subscriptions to CityCycle for AU$2 (about $1.50). Brisbane’s bike-share program is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Make certain you get yourself up to speed with Brisbane City Council’s bikeway and shared pathway maps to determine out where you could trip, park and hop on public transit with your bike in tow.

On Foot

If you’d alternatively rely on your own two toes than two wheels, Brisbane’s compact length lends itself properly to walking across the city. The Brisbane Riverwalk is a sequence of on foot paths, boardwalks, parks and bridges that run approximately 12 miles alongside the Brisbane River. On the river’s north bank, you may observe the Brisbane Riverwalk direction among The University of Queensland at St.Lucia campus and Teneriffe (a suburb east of downtown Brisbane). On the south bank, you could walk from the West End ferry terminal at Orleigh Park to Dockside at Kangaroo Point.

Car

Thanks to Brisbane’s reliable public transit system, you don’t actually need a car, despite the fact that you’re keen to discover the city’s suburbs. However, if you have your own set of wheels, you will be capable to challenge past the city’s borders for day trips to the Moreton Bay Region or the Redlands for vineyard tours or even more outdoor activities. Several rental organizations like Avis, Thrifty and Hertz, are stationed at Brisbane Airport; you may also rent cars from more than a few of companies placed in downtown Brisbane. You can use your American driver’s license to drive in Queensland, but keep in mind that you have to drive on the left side of the road.

Taxi

Several taxi companies provider the Brisbane area and can be flagged down from the streets around the town center, in most important neighborhoods and near shopping centers. You’ll additionally find lots of cabs waiting outdoor the arrivals vicinity at Brisbane Airport’s terminals. You can anticipate to pay around AU$51 (about $39) to get from the airport into the city. Taxi fares for journey round Brisbane fluctuate depending on the region wherein the taxi operates, however maximum preliminary fees (or “flagfalls”) begin at about AU$3 (or $2). You’ll be charged AU$4.84 (less than $4) for every kilometer (or a little more than half a mile) traveled, however, keep in mind that this amount can also fluctuate depending on the area. In case you’re going anyplace between the West End and Fortitude Valley and care for a scenic, unconventional ride, you can likewise call for a Green Cab, or pedicab. The value of the use of a green cab for a two- to three-block experience begins at AU$15 (approximately $11.50) per person.

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